Roof- Secrets Revealed

Roofing techniques are not only useful for those who actually put on the roof but also those whose houses are being outfitted with roofs. Outfitters who put this on can sometimes short a homeowner if they think the home owner is not as knowledgeable as they are when it comes to it. There are several layers to a roof and it is important to know these layers in order to have an inkling of how it provides protection to a home. The following common technique is applicable for both new and old roofs and starts with the lowermost layer from the top of the roof in description.

Sheathing

This is the initial layer that basically separates the ceiling from the other roofing layers. In some cases, the sheathing may actually be the ceiling. In other cases, they may be sheets of wood that are attached to the rafters of any roof. For houses with attics, these can be seen in the rafters. These need not be made up of sheets of wood or sheets of plywood; these days, many different materials are used for the sheathing.

Underlayment

This layer of the roofing technique is a necessity which is emphasized by the state law. Usually roofer’s felt is used for this layer but there are various materials available for this as well depending on the needs and preferences of the home owner or the building contractor. The underlayment gives some form of protection for the house against the different elements that may besiege the home that are first met by the roof.

The Roof

The last layer that is usually placed is the roof itself. The home owner also has various styles and materials to choose from for this layer. Metal sheets now come in various patterns and thickness. Some mimic classic patterns such as shingles, while others are more true to the metal roof pattern of bumps or indentations. These are actually quite inexpensive when compared to the other materials used for roofing. The problem with this variety is that they easily rust and may dent, warp or deform when branches fall on them, or if exposed to extreme elements, like hail, snow, and the like.

Asphalt or concrete surfaces may be sturdier than metal but they are also prone to leaks when they are not placed properly. The contractor needs to be familiar with this type of material and have people who are adept at the application. These may be heavier than other varieties and may need a sturdier base to bear the weight. The contractor should be able to see if the house has enough mass to bear the additional weight if it is a reroofing project.

Other materials such as slate and wood are basically the same as asphalt and concrete in terms of application. These need to be placed properly to make them last longer. Wood is prone to plants or moss growth due to its organic composition. These need to be cleared as soon as possible to avoid damage to the wood shingles or the wood slats.